Apr
1

The Only Way Out, Is Through

The Only Way Out, Is Through

I realise that these posts are starting to sound a bit the same, but there is a tedium to completing a larger body of writing which requires repetition. While the research and preparation phases have the fillip of consultation and an exchange of ideas – the actual gathering of those ideas onto the page requires a discipline for which there is no easy method.

Sometimes the drudgery of writing feels like dragging an oar through open water; or marching the grasslands of the Tundra; or embroidering the Bayou tapestry. Each  small step, stroke, stitch, and word makes a sentence, which makes a paragraph, which makes a page. You may be lucky enough to be able to dictate, but for most of us, the only one way out, is through.

Continue Reading…

Apr
1

All Alone With My Invisible Friends

All Alone With My Invisible Friends

It’s about now I wish for two things: 1) a natural talent for dialogue. I’d settle for a good ear for dialogue at the moment but no… it’s like I’m tone deaf to what people say… In fact – I was so distracted by that idea I took an on-line test… bugger it – I am border line tone deaf!

Continue Reading…

Apr
0

Pyjamas, Bells, and Bum Glue

Pyjamas, Bells, and Bum Glue

Ok, today is the day to don the jim-jams, and apply the bum glue. I have a story out-line, characters, a couple of jokes planned – now all I need is to write the damn thing.

Continue Reading…

Apr
4

First Draft Story Outline

First Draft Story Outline

Young TOM Cooper (13) arrives home in the endless summer afternoon of school holidays. He lives in a suburban paradise on the edge of the Australian bush. Garden hoses arc with Elysian abandon. Mr Wilson, a neighbour, is washing his car on his drive way. Fairies dance in the cooling air.

Continue Reading…

Apr
0

Writing for your Audience

Writing for your Audience

Ok, I’m in the home stretch of preparation.  I confess, I’m feeling squeamish about showing you the outline for the film I want to write – but having promised to blog the process, I guess it’s time to show you what a charlatan I am.

That said…

Continue Reading…

Apr
0

The Plot Thickens

The Plot Thickens

I’m like that television ad for language lessons, in which the German Coast Guard receives a mayday call, “Help! I’m sinking!” and the young guard replies, “Vot are you sinking about?”

It’s 2 am and I’m sinking. I’m sinking about my friggin’ plot. Seems we’ve entered the long dark night of the story.

Continue Reading…

Apr
1

The Long Dark Night of the Second Act

The Long Dark Night of the Second Act

So, I’m going through Hell, and I’m only 4 pages into my screenplay. I should, by logic of date, time, and final page requirements, be up to (ooo, say) page 23. But as you’ll see from reading through my previous pages – I’m still plotting. So what happened? You know what happened. You all be here at some point…

Act 2.

Continue Reading…

Apr
1

Get Out Your Building Blocks

Get Out Your Building Blocks

There are several excellent books by speakers who deal with structural analysis. Syd Field is the original and (in my opinion) his books are still the best. Linda Aronson  is also good for analysis of the deconstructed story. And (oh, alright) Robert McKee if you’re the sort of private school boy who wants to be whipped into shape (but, actually, Charlie Kaufman’s film, “Adaptation” is more entertaining and relevant to the writing process, and Brian Cox is less of a parody of McKee than Mr McKee.)

Continue Reading…

Apr
0

EXERCISE 2: Character Building

EXERCISE 2: Character Building

As a friend’s mother likes to tell me: “You need to have character, not be one.”

There is a Freudian notion that our motives are based on ‘seeking pleasure’ and ‘avoiding pain’. I don’t know much about psychology – but that’s a great paradigm for establishing your characters, and giving them a clear motive to be in your story.

Continue Reading…

Apr
3

Exercise 1: The Story

Exercise 1: The Story

Ok guys, it’s time to get out your nail gun and glue.  We’re gonna build us a story.

I thought by way of an example, I’d apply this to my Script Frenzy idea. I’m finding this a particularly vulnerable thing to do – so try not to judge me too harshly:

Can you tell your story in:
* One paragraph (The Pitch)?
* One page (The Story)?
* One sentence (The Theme – In A Nutshell)?

Continue Reading…